Auburn News

A Sustainable Auburn Marketplace

[dropcap style=”font-size: 60px; color: #9b9b9b;”] I [/dropcap] magine: The “War Eagle” wall next to Ware’s Jewelers in downtown Auburn has vendors in front selling local goods. There are fruits and vegetables grown by local elementary schools, a local bike store working on repairs and local artists and chefs showcasing their work. A bi-weekly market focused on everything local, everything sustainable.

When the lot isn’t being used as a market, it serves as a downtown “pocket park” for families and students to picnic or study.

The first site proposed for a sustainable marketplace in Auburn. Contributed by Ellie Lerner.

The first site proposed for a sustainable marketplace in Auburn. Contributed by Ellie Lerner.

This is the scene senior Ellie Lerner, junior Nick Chaplow and senior Zach Pate are building for their capstone project in their sustainability minor.

“We were racking our brains for these project ideas and I was trying to come up with something super innovative and scientific, and all I could think about was how you couldn’t go and get these necessities in downtown Auburn,” Lerner said. “It would be a much more walkable place if you could.”

Every semester since Auburn offered a sustainability minor six years ago, students participate in a capstone class and create a realistic plan to improve the sustainability of the city of Auburn and Auburn University. These projects then progress to become the foundation for new development plans implemented by Auburn.

Past projects have inspired a university bike share program, campus building design and sustainable foods in the Tiger Dining program.

Sitting in the back corner of the Reed Design Resource Center lounge on the basement floor of Spidle Hall with her phone plugged in beside her and her Mac laptop in front of her, Lerner works on the layout design of the marketplace. The final presentation will be on April 16, but designing and working out the kinks of a sustainable marketplace is time consuming.

The finished plan will have a list of potential booths. Bike repair, hands-on sustainability education, fresh produce and a compost trade are all on the table.

A draft of the logo for the sustainable marketplace in downtown Auburn. Contributed by Ellie Lerner.

A draft of the logo for the sustainable marketplace in downtown Auburn. Contributed by Ellie Lerner.

Lerner is an interior design major, but her resume is a self-described “circus.” She came to Auburn as a journalism major, switched to geology, spent a semester in Paris at Le Cordon Bleu, studied sustainability abroad in Fiji and started the improv comedy group Lee County Flannel Club at Auburn.

Chaplow is a building science major with a double minor in business and sustainability, and Pate is a hotel and restaurant management major. The three of them each bring different skill sets to the collaborative project.

“Sure, a marketplace has little to nothing to do with construction, but that’s not the point of sustainability,” Chaplow said. “The minor has taught me that if you feel passionate about changing something, you don’t necessarily need a particular skill set to research or fix it.”

The plans for a marketplace is a small step towards how Auburn could improve a sustainable lifestyle.

Sustainability has become a factor in all job fields, and education is the most important tool in improving the future. But in a town and university steeped in tradition, changing long-held attitudes is a challenge.

Lerner saw this first-hand at a No Impact Week event with author and “No Impact Man” Collin Beavan. The event was advertised throughout campus, but attendance was low.

“It’s so hard to get sustainability events marketed,” Lerner said. “It’s like, we’ve got to get people to care about this stuff, but how?”

Sustainability isn’t a bandwagon, says Lerner, it’s the future. Not just the future for grungy hippie types, but for everyone. Auburn has a responsibility in solving the nation’s problems as a land-grant university, and capstone project plans designed by Auburn University students are leading the way.

A map of downtown Auburn showing the proposed primary, secondary and tertiary areas for growth of the marketplace. Contributed by Ellie Lerner.

A map of downtown Auburn showing the proposed primary, secondary and tertiary areas for growth of the marketplace. Contributed by Ellie Lerner.